About

Katie

Katie

Designer Maker

Hello world, i’m Katie, a Nottingham based designer maker specialising in unique origami jewellery and sculpture created using recycled and reclaimed books.

As a child I was fascinated by books, stories and papers, and during my time at University this interest developed into a passion. I graduated in 2011 with a BA(Hons) in Decorative Arts, specialising in paper manipulation, and continue to create unique pieces of wearable art and sculpture using found books and papers.

 

More About Katie

More About Katie

Growing up in the historic city of Bath I was surrounded by breathtaking architecture and natural beauty, and always had a fascination with the asthetic. My childhood passions leaned towards music and creative writing before I finally discovered my love of art and design, completing a National Diploma in Fine Art at the City of Bath College in 2008, specialising in Printmaking.

Paper has always played a huge part in my life, whether I had realised it or not! My mother is an avide reader and my parents house is still filled floor to ceiling with old tomes. As a child I was fascinated by stories and papers, and it was during my time at University that I developed this latent interest into a real passion.

After completing my degree in Decorative Arts at Nottingham Trent University I decided to stay in the city I now called home and push the boundaries of my ideas, and of my materials! I currently work from my wonderful sunlit studio which is bursting at the seams with vintage books and papers – the perfect atmosphere for my lovingly constructed designs.

Artist Statement

Artist Statement

Paper has been an integral part of human life and has played a key role in societal and personal development since ancient times. Initially used to document and store information, paper was then bound and transformed into books, and as paper became readily available it was soon used as a cheap and immediate receptacle for the sharing of information and ideas. Books became containers – vessels for thoughts, feelings and knowledge.

Paper itself is a vulnerable material. It is susceptible to the elements, can be crumpled, ripped, burnt, stained and it can also decay over time. Considerable resources are expended each year in the task of preserving old tomes, and papers are now mostly developed acid-free to stop them degrading, further emphasizing our emphatic need for paper despite the development of modern technology and the internet. Paper is perhaps becoming an outdated method of sharing information but there is still a strong reverence for the old and a need to preserve the written word. Paper has yet to succumb to the pressure of technology and I believe this perfectly expresses the strength of paper as a multi-faceted artistic medium.

I often let my materials dictate colour, texture and feel and strive to allow the qualities of the paper to speak for itself. Through experimentation with paper techniques and effects I endeavour to explore the contemporary market for paper crafted items, working to reinvent the role of paper in the modern age.

The Origins of 3D Origami

The Origins of 3D Origami

Chinese Paper Folding (Zhezhi) is the predecessor of Japanese Origami and is now more popularly known as 3D Origami, Modular Origami or Golden Venture Paper Folding. Origami as we know it today is generally used to describe one piece of paper folded into a variety of different shapes and animals, whereas Chinese Paper Folding incorporates lots of smaller, modular pieces that are built up to create structures ranging from simple bowls to extravagant birds of paradise.

Many of us have dabbled in origami techniques even as children, creating waterbombs, cranes and hopping frogs, but 3D Origami Art has only just started to popularise in Western society. In 1992, 286 Chinese immigrants travelling to America aboard the freighter Golden Venture ran aground in New York City, and while waiting for trial for political asylum they created 3D Origami Art from magazines.

Since this incident 3D Origami has only grown in popularity. There are large scale conventions in countries across the world and artists have been busy creating more elaborate and extravagant designs using this simple folding technique. My own 3D Origami designs make use of several common triangular and rectangular folds that I have personally modified to more correctly suit my needs.

Copyright

The issue of copyright in Origami is a long and arduous debate. Origami techniques have been around since the 6th century and have been passed down through generations. I personally first learnt to make Origami in junior school from a creative classmate, but there are also hundreds if not thousands of books containing detailed instructions on how to create Origami animals and other designs. After searching long and hard to establish the original creator of the standard triangular folding method I use in my pieces I have concluded that he or she is probably long gone and forgotten, and such a task would match the enormity of establishing the inventor of the wheel. However if you have any information on this matter please let me know as I would be more than interested to know the exact origin of a technique I use daily to create my artworks.

 

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